1. Industry
Send to a Friend via Email

Your suggestion is on its way!

An email with a link to:

http://sustainability.about.com/od/Sustainability/a/Sustainability-Definitions-G.htm

was emailed to:

Thanks for sharing About.com with others!

Sustainability Definitions – G

Glossary of Sustainability Terms

By

Green Design The design of products, services, buildings, or experiences that are sensitive to environmental issues and achieve greater efficiency and effectiveness in terms of energy and materials.

Related Sustainability Articles:
Corporate Social Responsibility

Source:
The Presidio Graduate School - Online Dictionary of Sustainable Management


Green Building A comprehensive process of design and construction that employs techniques to minimize adverse environmental impacts and reduce the energy consumption of a building, while contributing to the health and productivity of its occupants. A common metric for green buildings is the LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification.

Related Sustainability Articles:
Corporate Social Responsibility

Source:
The Presidio Graduate School - Online Dictionary of Sustainable Management


Greenwashing A term merging the concepts of “green” (environmentally sound) and “whitewashing” (to conceal or gloss over wrongdoing). Greenwashing is any form of marketing or public relations that links a corporate, political, religious or nonprofit organization to a positive association with environmental issues for an unsustainable product, service, or practice.

In some cases, an organization may truly offer a “green” product, service or practice. However, through marketing and public relations, one is wrongly led to believe this “green” value system is ubiquitous throughout the entire organization.

Related Sustainability Articles:
Corporate Social Responsibility

Source:
The Presidio Graduate School - Online Dictionary of Sustainable Management


Greenhouse Gas Gases produced from human activities that trap solar radiation and thus contribute to climate change and the destruction of the ozone layer. These include: CO2 Carbon Dioxide CH4 Methane HFCs Hydrofluorocarbons (a class of several gasses) N2O Dinitrogen Oxide PFCs Perfluorocarbons (a class of several gasses) SF6 Sulfur Hexafluoride

Related Sustainability Articles:
Corporate Social Responsibility

Source:
The Presidio Graduate School - Online Dictionary of Sustainable Management


Green A common metaphor referring to environmental association based on the shared secondary color of many plants. It is often used to associate products, organizations, political parties, or policies with environmentally sensitivity.

Related Sustainability Articles:
Corporate Social Responsibility

Source:
The Presidio Graduate School - Online Dictionary of Sustainable Management


Green Marketing The positioning and segmenting of consumers by ecologically-driven concerns and the development of strategies and solutions that will meet their needs and desires with as little negative impact on the Earth as possible. Products and services which satisfy or appeal to these consumers are often called “green” and their advertising and promotion often make claims of less environmental impact in terms of energy, materials, processes, or toxic substances.

In addition, green marketing includes the representation of a company, product, or service as less harmful to nature. This can lead to greenwashing when this representation is neither sincere nor accurate. Other terms for this are Environmental Marketing and Ecological Marketing.

Related Sustainability Articles:
Corporate Social Responsibility

Source:
The Presidio Graduate School - Online Dictionary of Sustainable Management


Globalization The worldwide integration of products, services, employment, people, cultures, markets, and economies and the compression of both time and distance that often accompanies it. Globalization often refers specifically to the growing economic interdependence of countries worldwide through increasing cross-border transactions in goods and services, free flow of international capital, and more rapid and widespread diffusion of technology. Globalization is often confused with commercialization, where multination organizations exert global control over markets, workers, and customers. Globalization, in itself, is not necessarily a bad thing. Global interdependence, for example, can be a key ingredient to peaceful understanding and interaction between disparate cultures and communities.

Related Sustainability Articles:
Corporate Social Responsibility

Source:
The Presidio Graduate School - Online Dictionary of Sustainable Management


Garbage Anything that costs less to dispose of than it’s worth commercially. In many cases, these materials are the same being handled by manufacturers in the production of goods but because of supply chains, technology, and often subsidized capture and transportation industries, recyclable materials are often worth less than virgin materials. In addition, this includes only traditional financial costs and not social or environmental costs and benefits. As these costs are accounted for or offset, more material now considered garbage can become viable alternatives to virgin material.

Related Sustainability Articles:
Corporate Social Responsibility

Source:
The Presidio Graduate School - Online Dictionary of Sustainable Management


Green-collar Jobs Jobs created by investments and sustainable practices. Many skilled and unskilled jobs traditionally referred to as “blue-collar” jobs may be created and supported through the expansion of incentives and demand for sustainable building and installation of sustainable systems (such as solar panels, “green” remodeling, and gray-water systems) in the residential, commercial, and government markets. These “green-collar” jobs may employ those who are often left out of the tech boom cycles or do not have the skills, experience, or education to work in “white-collar” jobs. Championed by Van Jones, the founder of the Ella Baker Center for Human Rights in Oakland, California, “green-collar” jobs fill a variety of community and individual needs with rewarding, well-paying work that is sustainable and local (and aren’t easily outsourced overseas).

Related Sustainability Articles:
Corporate Social Responsibility

Source:
The Presidio Graduate School - Online Dictionary of Sustainable Management


GRI (Global Reporting Initiative) A multi-stakeholder process and independent institution whose mission is to develop and disseminate globally applicable Sustainability Reporting Guidelines. The guidelines were developed so that companies, government agencies, and non-governmental organizations can report on the economic, environmental, and social dimensions of their activities, products and services. Started in 1997 by the Coalition for Environmentally Responsible Economies (CERES) and the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP), the GRI incorporates the active participation of representatives from business, accountancy, investment, environmental, human rights, research, and labor organizations from around the world. Critics of the 2002 guidelines note that corporations were only required to describe procedures and practices rather than demonstrating that these procedures had been put into practice.

Related Sustainability Articles:
Corporate Social Responsibility

Source:
The Presidio Graduate School - Online Dictionary of Sustainable Management


©2014 About.com. All rights reserved.